The Atlantis Gene (The Origin Mystery #1)

The Atlantis Gene

What a slow old read or actually a listen. Eventually, I got back into the audiobook but it was not really that enjoyable. Took a long time for justice to be done to the evil doers (or if it did happen) and the action at times stretched belief. Don’t expect all your answers will be found by the end as this is part of a longer arc. The premises and sciences are interesting and imaginative. The notion of triggering underlying genetic material is quite modern and observed in some bacteria. I suggest reading on paper may be more satisfying. Not sure I will be seeking out the second volume.

From Goodreads
THE GREATEST MYSTERY OF ALL TIME…
THE HISTORY OF HUMAN ORIGINS…
WILL BE REVEALED.

————————————

70,000 years ago, the human race almost went extinct.
We survived, but no one knows how.
Until now.
The countdown to the next stage of human evolution is about to begin, and humanity may not survive this time.

————————————

The Immari are good at keeping secrets. For 2,000 years, they have hidden the truth about human evolution. And they’ve searched for an ancient enemy — a threat that could wipe out the human race. Now the search is over.

Off the coast of Antarctica, a research vessel has discovered a mysterious structure buried deep in an iceberg. It’s been there for thousands of years, and it isn’t man made. The Immari think they know what it is, but they aren’t taking any chances. The time has come to execute their master plan: humanity must evolve or perish. In a lab in Indonesia, a brilliant geneticist may have just discovered the key to their plan.

Four years ago, Dr. Kate Warner left California for Jakarta, Indonesia to escape her past. She hasn’t recovered from what happened to her, but she has made an incredible discovery: a cure for autism. Or so she thinks. What she’s found is actually far more dangerous. Her research could rewrite human history and unleash the next stage of human evolution. In the hands of the Immari, it would mean the end of humanity as we know it.

One man has seen pieces of the Immari conspiracy: Agent David Vale. But he’s out of time to stop it. His informant is dead. His organization has been infiltrated. His enemy is hunting him. But when he receives a cryptic code from an anonymous source, he risks everything to save the only person that can solve it: Dr. Kate Warner.

Now Kate and David must race to unravel a global conspiracy and learn the truth about the Atlantis Gene… and human origins. Their journey takes them to the far corners of the globe and into the secrets of their pasts. The Immari are close on their heels and will stop at nothing to find the Atlantis Gene and force the next stage of human evolution — even if it means killing 99.9% of the world’s population. David and Kate can stop them… if they can trust each other. And stay alive.

—— About ——
THE ATLANTIS GENE is a thought-provoking techno-thriller about global genetic experiments, ancient conspiracies, and the mysteries of human evolution. Its complex characters and historical and scientific details will stay with you long after you finish. This sci-fi adventure is the first book in A.G. Riddle’s Origin Mystery Series.

NYPD Red 2

NYPD Red 2

Interesting premise and reasonably executed. I felt too much time was spent on the somewhat unrealistic love life of the main characters. Hopefully, the long arcs will not dominate the individual novel’s plots into the future.

From Goodreads
When NYPD Red arrives at a crime scene, everyone takes notice. Known as the protectors of the rich, famous, and connected, NYPD Red is the elite task force called in only for New York City’s most high-profile crimes. And Detective Zach Jordan is the best of the best, a brilliant and relentless pursuer of justice. He puts professionalism above all, ignoring his feelings for his partner, Detective Kylie MacDonald, the woman who broke his heart when they first met in the academy.

But even with their top-notch training, Zach and Kylie aren’t prepared for what they see when they’re called to a crime scene in the heart of Central Park. They arrive to find a carousel spinning round and round, its painted horses grinning eerily in the early morning dark. There is only one rider: a brutally slaughtered woman, her body tied up and dressed in a Hazmat suit, on display for the world to see.

The victim, a woman of vast wealth and even greater connections, is the fourth in a string of shocking murders that have hit the city. As the public pressure mounts, and political and personal secrets of the highest order hang in the balance, Zach and Kylie must find out what’s really behind the murderer’s rampage. But Kylie has been acting strange recently–and Zach knows whatever she’s hiding could threaten the biggest case of their careers.

NYPD Red 2 is the next outstanding novel in James Patterson’s newest series, a thriller that careens through New York City and deep into the psyche of a depraved killer you’ve never seen before.

Divine Justice (Camel Club 4) by David Baldacci

Divine Justice

This was my second read of this book and my introduction to the series of The Camel Club. It is really very good and rates at least a 3.5 stars. I had forgotten a lot of the detail in four years. Lot of good characterisations and looking forward to going back into time to read the earlier volumes.

On Goodreads: Known by his alias, “Oliver Stone,” John Carr is the most wanted man in America. With two pulls of the trigger, the men who hid the truth of Stone’s past and kept him in the shadows were finally silenced. But Stone’s freedom has come at a steep price; the assassinations he carried out have prompted the highest levels of the United States Government to unleash a massive manhunt. Joe Knox is leading the charge, but his superiors aren’t telling him everything there is to know about his quarry-and their hidden agendas are just as dangerous as the killer he’s trying to catch. Meanwhile, with their friend and unofficial leader in hiding, the members of the Camel Club must fend for themselves, even as they try to protect him. As Knox closes in, Stone’s flight from the demons of his past will take him far from Washington D.C., to the small, isolated coal-mining town of Devine, Virginia-and into a confrontation every bit as bloody lethal as the one he left behind.

Flames of Rebellion by Warwick O’Neill

Flames of Rebellion

To be reviewd…

On Goodreads: On his release from gaol, all Patrick Flanagan wanted was a good woman, a family and a peaceful life. Then he heard the call that reverberated around the world. Gold! Leaving Moreton Bay behind, he jumps aboard The Cumberland to work for his passage to the goldfields. On the voyage he befriends Fergus, an old sailor at the crossroads of new technology. Together the pair jump ship in Melbourne and head towards the Ballarat Goldfields to make their fortune. But, their dreams of easy riches are soon shattered as they not only battle the elements and the elusive nature of the gold, but also corrupt administrators and brutal law enforcement officers of the Colony, including an old acquaintance of Patrick’s. As the group struggle to make a living from the unforgiving earth, events move inexorably towards a fateful collision between the authorities and goldminers, testing the loyalties of the group and finding Patrick on the frontline facing Government forces as they emerge from the early morning mist.

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic

Fun Home

A complex graphic novel said to be part of the emerging modern literature. Not something I would call a ‘good’ read but undoubtedly a wonderful construction of thoughts, emotions, life recall, and visual interpretation. As a piece of literature to ‘study’, it has merit but it just wasn’t for me. It does not remain on my re-read list but the intertextual references (some listed below) are very interesting for a book lover.

On Goodreads: In this graphic memoir, Alison Bechdel charts her fraught relationship with her late father.

Distant and exacting, Bruce Bechdel was an English teacher and director of the town funeral home, which Alison and her family referred to as the Fun Home. It was not until college that Alison, who had recently come out as a lesbian, discovered that her father was also gay. A few weeks after this revelation, he was dead, leaving a legacy of mystery for his daughter to resolve.

For intertextual references go to Alison Bechdel.

NYPD Red by James Patterson

NYPD Red

An interesting yarn but lacked some literary depth. The dialogue was quick and cutting and the concept for future novels has been established. More holiday reading but very American centric. I thought the scenarios were clever but somewhat unrealistic including the end game but I have to admit my interest remained tempted to find out what would happen. A little Hollywood for the ending – so to speak.

On Goodreads: It’s the start of Hollywood on Hudson, and New York City is swept up in the glamour. Every night, the red carpet rolls out for movie stars arriving at premieres in limos; the most exclusive restaurants close for private parties for wealthy producers and preeminent directors; and thousands of fans gather with the paparazzi, hoping to catch a glimpse of the most famous and beautiful faces in the world. With these many celebrities in town, special task force NYPD Red is on high alert-and they can’t afford to make a single mistake. Then a world-renowned producer fatally collapses at his power breakfast, and top NYPD Red Detective Zach Jordan is the first one on the scene. Zach works with his beautiful new partner, Detective Kylie MacDonald-who also happens to be his ex-girlfriend-to discover who the murderer might be. But this is only the beginning: the most brutal, public, and horrifyingly spectacular crimes they’ve ever encountered are about to send all of New York into chaos, putting NYPD Red on the ropes. Zach and Kylie know there’s no way of telling what a killer this deranged will do next. With the whole world watching, they have to find a way to stop a psychopath who has scripted his finale down to the last explosive detail. With larger-than-life action, relentless speed, and white-knuckle twists, NYPD Red is the next mega-blockbuster from “The Man Who Can’t-Miss.” (TIME)

By The Book – Edited by Pamela Paul

Writers on Literature and the Literary Life from The New York Times Book Review

By The Books

An interesting read with some many tips and hints on what to read next! Many of these referenced texts will be highlighted in Zimply Reads and Goodreads.

On Goodreads: Sixty-five of the world’s leading writers open up about the books and authors that have meant the most to them

Every Sunday, readers of The New York Times Book Review turn with anticipation to see which novelist, historian, short story writer, or artist will be the subject of the popular By the Book feature. These wide-ranging interviews are conducted by Pamela Paul, the editor of the Book Review, and here she brings together sixty-five of the most intriguing and fascinating exchanges, featuring personalities as varied as David Sedaris, Hilary Mantel, Michael Chabon, Khaled Hosseini, Anne Lamott, and James Patterson. The questions and answers admit us into the private worlds of these authors, as they reflect on their work habits, reading preferences, inspirations, pet peeves, and recommendations.

By the Book contains the full uncut interviews, offering a range of experiences and observations that deepens readers’ understanding of the literary sensibility and the writing process. It also features dozens of sidebars that reveal the commonalities and conflicts among the participants, underscoring those influences that are truly universal and those that remain matters of individual taste.

For the devoted reader, By the Book is a way to invite sixty-five of the most interesting guests into your world. It’s a book party not to be missed.

Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood

Natural Way of Things

Another set text for Australian literature studies and certainly Charlotte Wood is a gifted writer. I suspect many rereads are in the wind and there is a lot to explore. The Lord of The Flies reprise is well done and the characterisations strong yet intensely feminine. The males are simple pastiches but what else could they be. It is intensely hard to cross the genders but it is always interesting to see what women do with men in life and literature. The ending leaves many questions and possibly invites more narrative in the future but then again maybe that is exactly what the writer intended.

On Goodreads: Two women awaken from a drugged sleep to find themselves imprisoned in an abandoned property in the middle of a desert in a story of two friends, sisterly love and courage – a gripping, starkly imaginative exploration of contemporary misogyny and corporate control, and of what it means to hunt and be hunted.

Strangers to each other, they have no idea where they are or how they came to be there with eight other girls, forced to wear strange uniforms, their heads shaved, guarded by two inept yet vicious armed jailers and a ‘nurse’. The girls all have something in common, but what is it? What crime has brought them here from the city? Who is the mysterious security company responsible for this desolate place with its brutal rules, its total isolation from the contemporary world? Doing hard labour under a sweltering sun, the prisoners soon learn what links them: in each girl’s past is a sexual scandal with a powerful man. They pray for rescue – but when the food starts running out it becomes clear that the jailers have also become the jailed. The girls can only rescue themselves.

Private Paris (Private #10 )by James Patterson

Private Paris

First one of this series I think I have read. Will have to check. Not a bad narrative but a classic plot of misdirection and the usual amazing good guy survivals. Good holiday reading if brains need a rest. Will check out a few more.

On Goodreads: Paris is burning–and only Private’s Jack Morgan can put out the fire.
When Jack Morgan stops by Private’s Paris office, he envisions a quick hello during an otherwise relaxing trip filled with fine food and sightseeing. But Jack is quickly pressed into duty after a call from his client Sherman Wilkerson, asking Jack to track down his young granddaughter who is on the run from a brutal drug dealer.

Before Jack can locate her, several members of France’s cultural elite are found dead–murdered in stunning, symbolic fashion. The only link between the crimes is a mysterious graffiti tag. As religious and ethnic tensions simmer in the City of Lights, only Jack and his Private team can connect the dots before the smouldering powder keg explodes.

The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett

The Colour of Magic

Chaos is Terry Pratchett! It is hard to be a truly unique author but Lord Pratchett (well he should have been) hit the heights from day one. So intuitive, so witty and completely not of Earth he is/was a master of fantasy. Looking forward to re-reading this series in 2018 just for the smiles. I do not profess to understand more than 70% of what he says as I simply read either too fast or can’t remember the complexity of what came before.
Not for everyone I suspect but certainly a literature experience for those who persist.
Thanks to the Gods – especially those who cannot be named – for Terry. Rest well wherever you are residing.

On Goodreads: On a world supported on the back of a giant turtle (sex unknown), a gleeful, explosive, wickedly eccentric expedition sets out. There’s an avaricious but inept wizard, a naive tourist whose luggage moves on hundreds of dear little legs, dragons who only exist if you believe in them, and of course THE EDGE on the planet…